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Swalwell says we have good reason to fear more interference at the ballot

As a member of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Dublin, sees a lot of intel few others do. And he’s very frustrated that the United States has done little to protect its election system from another attack by Russia, another foreign country or even a lone wolf.

“By what we have done so far — which is almost nothing — we are inviting the Russians to attack us again,” Swalwell said during a talk this week with The Chronicle’s editorial board.

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US Representative Swalwell calls on social media companies to protect elections

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DUBLIN, Calif. (KGO) -- The Senate Judiciary Committee is now inviting the CEO's of Facebook, Twitter and Google to an opening hearing on data privacy. The meeting will happen early next month.

The invitation comes just hours after the Federal Trade Commission announced it's investigating Facebook about the company's privacy practices. Facebook has been under intense criticism after it was revealed that the data of up to 50 million users was improperly obtained by the data firm Cambridge Analytica and used in the presidential election.

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House Republicans are doing all they can to help Trump with the Russia probe

When Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee ended their year-long investigation into Russian election meddling Monday, they took direct aim at the US intelligence community — and added fuel to a simmering political fight about whether Russia actively tried to help Donald Trump win the White House.

Republicans on the committee said Monday that they believed Russia interfered with the election, but rejected the US intelligence committee’s unanimous assessment that Moscow did so with the explicit goal of ensuring Trump defeated Hillary Clinton.

That directly contradicts the intelligence community’s assessment from January 2017, which clearly states that Russia wanted Trump to win. It also contradicts special counsel Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russians for working to help Trump win by sowing divisions via the internet.

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Hope Hicks refused to answer whether "a litany" of Trump associates asked her to lie

In a rare, on-the-record accounting of some of the House Intelligence committee's secret, closed-door proceedings, two members of the House Intelligence Committee explained to CBS News what led White House communications director Hope Hicks to say her work for President Trump occasionally required her to tell "white lies." Hicks testified for nine hours Tuesday as part of the committee's ongoing investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election -- and announced one day later she will be resigning, for reasons the White House said were unrelated to her testimony. 

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Editorial: Indictment makes clear — the Russians meddled in a big way

The investigation President Trump long derided as “a witch hunt” just caught its first 13 witches. A 37-page indictment by a federal grand jury provides detailed evidence of a brazen Russian conspiracy that began in 2014 as an effort to disrupt the American democratic process generally, and evolved in 2016 into a concerted effort to boost the candidacy of Donald Trump.

The nexus of this sophisticated operation was a Russian “troll farm” called the Internet Research Agency, which sought to carry out “information warfare against the United States of America” according to the indictment delivered by special counsel Robert Mueller.

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Members of Congress likely paid a lot less for college than you

California Congressman Eric Swalwell’s experience of financing higher education will ring familiar to many members of his generation, but likely not to many of his colleagues.

The now 37-year-old, attended public institutions for his undergraduate and law school degrees — the latter in-state — worked while in college, had an athletic scholarship at one point, got some help from his parents and yet still managed to graduate from both institutions with about $150,000 in student loans.

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Can congressional action help protect a free press?

I could not be more appreciative of the sentiment behind the Journalist Protection Act, just introduced by Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Dublin. The threat of violence against journalists is no longer an abstract concept or other countries’ problems in the Trump era. President Trump has been spewing the type of anti-media vitriol by national leaders that has led to physical attacks on reporters in places such as Chechnya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Iran and Egypt.

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Congressman Eric Swallwell introduces Journalism Protection Act to counteract Trump era

 - A Bay Area Congressman on Monday introduced the first bill of its kind to make it a federal crime to physically attack journalists reporting the news. 

Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Castro Valley) said that the "Journalist Protection Act" was developed as a direct result of the “climate of extreme hostility to the press” created by President Donald Trump.

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Dem congressman: Memo slams FBI to protect Trump

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Tucker Carlson interviews Rep. Eric Swalwell, who says the Devin Nunes-authored memo will sacrifice the reputation of the FBI for politics.

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Interview with Rep. Eric Swalwell

Rep. Eric Swalwell talks about the Russia Investigation, and whether he thinks Republicans are attempting to obstruct justice.

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