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Democrats eye revival of Russia probe if they win House

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are expected to re-open the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election if they win the majority in November. But they would have to be selective in what they investigate.

California Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House intelligence panel, has said his party would have to "ruthlessly prioritize the most important matters first."

The Republican-led Intelligence Committee was the only House panel to investigate Russian meddling, and its investigation is now closed. Republicans say they found no evidence of collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump's campaign.

Democrats say Republicans ignored key facts and important witnesses and want to restart parts of the investigation if they win the House. But some Democrats also worry that there could be a political cost if they overreach.

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America Doesn’t Need Allies Who Torture And Murder Journalists

With the Saudi monarchy apparently still not prepared to tell the world what happened to Jamal Khashoggi during an interrogation in Turkey, America must act decisively and immediately to oppose authoritarian violence against journalists and critics.

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America Doesn’t Need Allies Who Torture And Murder Journalists | Opinion

With the Saudi monarchy apparently still not prepared to tell the world what happened to Jamal Khashoggi during an interrogation in Turkey, America must act decisively and immediately to oppose authoritarian violence against journalists and critics.

As our president assails news media as “enemies of the people,” Congress must step up to compel action in defense of human rights and a free press.

Khashoggi—a legal permanent U.S. resident since 2008, and an outspoken critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s policies—was last seen October 2 entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. He sought paperwork so he could marry his Turkish fiancée. He never emerged.

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Editorial: Re-elect Baker for Assembly, Swalwell for Congress

by Pleasanton Weekly editorial board

Incumbent Congressman Eric Swalwell (D-Dublin) is seeking a fourth straight term representing District 15. His challenger is Rudy Peters (R-Livermore), a Navy veteran and owner of a systems engineering firm.

Swalwell is the strong voice the Tri-Valley needs in Congress.

The former Dublin councilman and Alameda County prosecutor continues to be a presence throughout his district and is responsive to constituents.

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Rep. Eric Swalwell was UMD’s first city council liaison. Now, he’s eyeing the White House.

Experts say he has a long way to go, but Swalwell hasn't ruled out a run at the presidency.

Eric Swalwell

When Congressman Eric Swalwell arrived at the University of Maryland in 2001, he encountered a campus at odds with its city.

After the Terps basketball team blew a 22-point lead against Duke in the Final Four that March, university students lit more than 60 fires around the city, causing about $500,000 in damage.

So, in an attempt to mend the relationship, Swalwell worked to get a university student on the city council.

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Nunes buried evidence on Russian meddling to protect Trump. I know because I’m on the committee

No one really expected President Donald Trump, who benefited from Russia’s 2016 election interference, to counter that hostile regime’s active measures: Russia wanted him to win, and when they hacked, he invited them to hack more.

But America should have been able to rely on a united Congress to ensure that our next elections aren’t just as vulnerable if not moreso. Instead, due to House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes’ persistent and pernicious obstruction, America has been spectacularly let down.

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Stanford students launch app to help constituents connect with Congress

College students around the country greeted Donald Trump’s presidential victory by joining protests, volunteering for political campaigns and registering to vote.

Four Stanford undergrads had a more typical Silicon Valley response: build an app.

The result is Pulse, a new service that helps connect voters more directly with their member of Congress

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No faith can be America’s enemy

“How do you determine the quality of a rug?” I asked Pakistan’s national security adviser, as he presented me with a rolled-up gift in his Islamabad office. “It’s the knots per square inch,” he replied. “The more knots woven together, the higher the quality.”

I couldn’t help but thinking how that sounds like a community. Just like a rug, it’s diversity — people of all backgrounds, tightly woven together — that makes a community strong and great.

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What I felt when visiting Alabama

Congressman John Lewis of Georgia, my colleague and hero, often talks about making "good trouble" - rising to one's moral obligation to speak up and get in the way of bad policy

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As we look back at 9/11, let’s recapture the spirit of uniting to protect America

Seventeen years ago today, I was coming up out of the Metro subway when I realized the world had changed.

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